F#17: Seafoam Dragon

Seafoam dragon (Draconis Nausicaa)

Aquatic fauna

seafoam dragon

 

The seafoam dragon is native to the Mediterranean sea, but this one showed up in Revery Harbour after a massive storm- she must have been blown off course.

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This small aquatic dragon has long webbed forefingers, perfect for breaking open tightly closed shellfish and mollusks. They breathe both underwater and out of it, and lay their eggs in the sand like turtles. A clutch normally consists of five, one to three of which are expected to hatch. Once all the surviving eggs hatch, the parent leads the hatchlings to the water, and they stay in the sandy shallows for a few days before venturing further out.

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Entry compiled by: Jesper Beattie

sea dragon

 

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F#16: Butterfly Dragon (Draconis Papilionem)

Name: Butterfly dragon (Draconis Papilionem)

Classification: Fauna

Designation: Neutral

Notes: A standard feature of greetings cards, the butterfly dragon is a shy creature that prefers a warmer climate and plenty of fruit and nectar. A great place to spot them is an orchard after the first windfalls; descending in large flocks to feast on the fruit and bask in the sunshine.

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Wild cherries are another favourite food.

Many attempts have been made to domesticate this member of the dragon family, but aside from a butterfly dragon perching on your hand there is not much chance of this.

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They are not a species that thrives in captivity; well known to ‘fade’ both literally, their bright colours becoming dull, and figuratively, a greatly reduced lifespan. It’s far better to watch them in your garden, and wait for them to return the following summer.

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Entry Complied by: Keeley Claremont

F#14: Tuft

Name: Tuft

Classification: Fauna (insect)

Designation: Neutral

Description: A fluffy green winged creature with a leafy face and shiny black eyes.

Notes: The tuft is possibly of fae origin, and is found in places where the skin between worlds is at its thinnest. When capture of one is attempted; the tuft appears to be able to manipulate its own corporeality, literally slipping through the fingers of its would-be captor.

Entry Compiled by: Evelyn Morris

 

F#12: Puffmote

 

Name: Luminous Puffmote, Airbag Salamander*

Classification: Fauna

Designation: Neutral

Description: A Fully-grown male puffmote measures from 2-5cm long (nose to tail) with a dark coloured body and lighter, bioluminescent markings.

A Female or ‘Queen’ puffmote has a longer, snakelike body. She is typically white, with darker markings, and a more defined crest or ‘crown’.

*Misnomer, puffmotes are unrelated to salamanders

Notes: puffmotes emerge from sleep in the late afternoon; often to be found hovering around flowers in sun-warmed places. The ones you’ll see in the daylight are typically the males, collecting nectar which is then stored in an internal pouch.

The puffmote Queen anchors herself to a plant stem, and is much harder to spot during the day. However, at night she is far more noticeable.

Often mistaken for the light of a glow worm or firefly, puffmote have bioluminescent markings. Males have a small glowing crest, and markings down to their tails. Queens have a bright crown and body spots, which they use in a ‘dance’ to attract mates.

 

Entry compiled by: Thursday Madaki

F#10: Fungal Glum

Name: Fungal Glum

Class:  Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: A brown, hairy body with two large feet and large yellow eyes. Algae, fungi and moss grow in its fur, most distinctively the top of its head.

Notes: At first you might mistake it for a tuft of dead grass or a root-ball, but then you see its face, its eyes, its large feet…

The fungal glum gets its eponymous fungus by not moving very much. Once it finds a good spot in its preferred damp habitat- marsh, swamp, or dense woodland- there it stays.

It is a symbiotic relationship: the glum and the fungus provide each other with protection from their respective predators. Foxes, badgers and others that would eat the glum are put off by the poisonous toadstools and algae; and insects attracted to the fungus are eaten by the glum, which also provides a perfect growing environment.

Entry Compiled by: Thursday Madaki

F#09: Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Name: Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Class: Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: This medium sized member of the Avum Pilosus (Griffin) species has glossy black and white plumage with a distinctive blue/green sheen; and long tail feathers.

Notes: The most common Griffin to see in the wild, found across Europe and Asia. The Magpie Griffin is omnivorous, eating insects, fruit, seeds, carrion, eggs and young birds.

It is also considered to be one of the most intelligent of the species, capable of complex emotion, social rituals and use of tools. They are rarely seen alone, remaining in tightly knit groups consisting of up to five families. In some urban areas, these noisy, raucous flocks are considered vermin.

 

Entry Compiled by: Jesper Beattie

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Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

F#08: Wyvern Hatchling

Name: Wyvern Hatchling (‘Green Glass Scale’)

Class: Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: Green skinned with soft, transparent scales and large yellow eyes. Wyverns have a pair of wings as forelimbs, differentiating them from other dragon species, which typically have four legs + wings.

Notes: This wyvern hatched this morning, the first successful birth of its species in the South West Dragon Centre! Critically endangered, the ‘Green Glass’ Wyvern is named for its transparent scales, which take years to harden as it matures. This vulnerability has left the small dragon species struggling, but efforts to breed them in captivity are finally paying off.

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