Intermission: Concept vs Creature

Today was the last day of my market stall! Thursdays comic will be posted as normal, and my etsy will also reopen the same day. Because of the market I don’t have a new creature for you- but I do have some comparisons of my concept sketches I draw before I start making them, and the eventual creature you see on the site. I hope this is interesting! 

One of my earliest creatures, sprout was little more than a scribble. I think he turned out cuter?

When is a hippogriff not a hippogriff? When it’s pretty much another creature entirely!
I stayed pretty close to the sketch here, but couldn’t get the face the same.
Hekbune: probably the closest to a sketch I have ever made. I drew him several times before attempting the model, so perhaps that’s why!

F#33: Ornamental Hippogriff (wingless)

(Ornamental Hippogriff on etsy)

First brought to the Britain by the Victorians, the ornamental hippogriff still wanders the grand estate grounds and parkland- and the countryside, as they quickly escaped captivity and flourished independently.

IMG_7069

Unlike their large winged cousins, who thrive in cold climates, this breed of small hippogriff prefers mild winters; they keep their short, soft fur all year ’round and don’t grow the distinctive thick white fur that true hippogriffs are known for.

IMG_7071

Avid insectivores, these creatures are a great solution to garden pests- particularly fond of slugs and caterpillars.

IMG_6944

Due to their association with wealth and land, they often appear on heraldry and in portraits: a symbol of fortune.

IMG_6952

F#24: Domestic Manticore Kitten

‘Beep’ Domesticated Manticore Mardyakhor Mansueti

 There are many reasons why people might rehome a manticore bred by Eliza Knights-Herbert of 23 Rose Street, Revery. Most of these reasons relate back to their finicky personailities, or the ability to dissolve things just by looking at them.

Beep, however, was left with us at the institute because she is blind. Her previous family were displeased with her lack of laser vision, and feared she would no longer be an effective burgalar deterrent- a legitimate concern.

Luckily, Beep has found a new forever home, and will only be staying with us briefly before travelling to Gloucestershire- our resident manticore Percy will miss her.

F#23: Wyrm Hatchlings

Wyrm Hatchlings (Northen European Wyrm) 

Dragon species

When we got the call about an ‘infestation of worms’, we might have reacted a mite too hastily with our stock (polite!) ‘we are a research institute, not Revery Pest Control’ response.




After the miscommunication was cleared up, we arrived at a small garden in the suburbs- only to find these week-old specimens of the European small wyrm causing havoc and destruction in their pursuit of a Sunday dinner.

These dragons are rarely found in built up areas (and almost never in the south of England) and there was no sign of the parent wyrm, who normally feeds young in the nest until they are a month old. It seemed as if the babies had been fending for themselves for a few days- feeding on insects and tearing up the garden in the process.



After a short (but chaotic) pursuit, Evelyn and I caught all three at the same time and took them back to the institute.


They have settled down in the break room in Keeley’s hat, whilst we contact the South West Dragon Centre to see if they have a spare pen…

F#10: Fungal Glum

Name: Fungal Glum

Class:  Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: A brown, hairy body with two large feet and large yellow eyes. Algae, fungi and moss grow in its fur, most distinctively the top of its head.

Notes: At first you might mistake it for a tuft of dead grass or a root-ball, but then you see its face, its eyes, its large feet…

The fungal glum gets its eponymous fungus by not moving very much. Once it finds a good spot in its preferred damp habitat- marsh, swamp, or dense woodland- there it stays.

It is a symbiotic relationship: the glum and the fungus provide each other with protection from their respective predators. Foxes, badgers and others that would eat the glum are put off by the poisonous toadstools and algae; and insects attracted to the fungus are eaten by the glum, which also provides a perfect growing environment.

Entry Compiled by: Thursday Madaki

F#09: Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Name: Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Class: Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: This medium sized member of the Avum Pilosus (Griffin) species has glossy black and white plumage with a distinctive blue/green sheen; and long tail feathers.

Notes: The most common Griffin to see in the wild, found across Europe and Asia. The Magpie Griffin is omnivorous, eating insects, fruit, seeds, carrion, eggs and young birds.

It is also considered to be one of the most intelligent of the species, capable of complex emotion, social rituals and use of tools. They are rarely seen alone, remaining in tightly knit groups consisting of up to five families. In some urban areas, these noisy, raucous flocks are considered vermin.

 

Entry Compiled by: Jesper Beattie

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑