Archive1: Memos R.E an Interns Eardrum

memo1

 

(Original Post)

See the ‘Changes’ post before this for an explanation!

Archive23: The Knucker Hole Dragon

This summer may be full of weird cult activity and necromancer shennanigans, but the Seaflower Institute still has normal work to do.

Well, comparatively normal, I mean. Like, going to check up on an ancient dragon. That kind of normal.

The village of Lyminster in West Sussex is home to Knucker Hole, a supposedly bottomless blue pool. It was in this pool, the legend goes, that the Knucker lived; a fearsome dragon that tormented the local villages, until it was eventually slain- either by a knight in the traditional fashion, or a cunning baker via a poisoned pie.

Lyminster Church stained glass window depiction the slaying of the Knucker Hole monster


More likely, the dragon activity subsided due to the dragons hibernation cycle, which typically involves napping for a few hundred years.


Aerial view of the hole- thanks google!


We like to keep an eye on the Knucker, so every five years or so, someone goes to check its still alive- and this time it was me and Jesper’s turn. So, armed with dragon repellent and welly boots, we ventured to sussex.

The farmers whose livestock graze in the surrounding fields are certainly taking no chances- as Jesper found out when he accidentally touched the stock fencing.

The pool is pretty secure behind a high gate and barbed wire-topped fence. We were let in, and stood at the edge of the water like two clueless kids on the doorstep of an ancient monster.


One living dragon? Check. Lets not do that again.

F#25: Devilmite

I was eating breakfast when I heard it: a rustling in the pantry. Best case scenario: it was a foraging venomstriker; worst case scenario: I had mice.

Turns out, it wasn’t either of those: when I opened the cuboard; armed with a glass and a roll of newspaper, I found this little guy:

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This is a devilmite, so named for its horned appearance and tendency to steal food. (i.e. Begone, devilmite!)

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It was obviously used to people, and didn’t make a fuss when I took it outside- it even stuck around to suss me out, before scooting over the wall next door (A bakery, where it will probably decimate their stock. Oops.)

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Archive#21: Posters

Clearing out the archives, I found a few posters that might be of interest.

BE FAIRIE AWARE
An official poster produced by the SFI in the early 2000s as part of a government campaign.
repot copy
Keeley’s homemade sign that goes up without fail every late spring. Heed its warning!
sketch1502367185233
Pre-seaflower poster I picked up at a sale a few years ago. This was made in the 90s, when there was a fad amongst teens to try out some necromancy rituals for a fun night out. Necromancy: not even once.

Archive18: Moosepig

Yes, you heard him: moose pig.

First sighted in 1802, the Beast of Dean- or the more affectionate ‘moose pig’- is an enormous boar. Normal wild boar get pretty big, but not large enough to knock down trees and crush fences, as this little-known cryptid is reported to do.

Claims range from ‘the size of a cow’ to ‘large dog’, and having an ‘unearthly roar’.

Until this week the most recent sighting was in 2008. However, a recent spate of reports means Jesper and I will be going to the Forest of Dean to investigate, much to his delight.

Catch you later! Keeley xxx

Jesper pictured for comparison

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