F#48: Omen Manifest

Technically, these aren’t creatures- and if you see one, it should be reported immediately for your own safety.

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An omen manifest is a summoned energy, that possesses the ‘body’ made for it by the summoner. The body must be made from a bone and animal hair.

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Summoning an omen is considered a necromantic act, and is illegal.

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Owlbear (Commission Special (OOC))

An Owlbear from dungeons and dragons- done on commission for a lovely customer I met at Gloucester christmas market!

He’ll be in the post on the way to his new home tomorrow.

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Etsy Shop

F#39: Frost Wyrm

(Frost Wyrm on etsy)

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The frost wyrm is a member of the dragon family- one of the smallest, measuring on average only 24cm long.

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These wyrms radiate cold- in lower temperatures, even enough to freeze the spot on which they are perched.

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For this reason they are unpopular with gardeners- woe betide any delicate stem that comes in contacts with the wyrm’s icy touch!

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However, seeing a frost wyrm can be a good sign- a wyrm in a sloe bush means the berries are ready for picking- or so says the old wives tale.

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F#38: Cornus Martes

Also known as the ‘weasel dragon’ (though it has no link to the dragon species, this name probably due to the similarity of some features to that of Asian lung dragons), this creature roams some of the coldest climes of the northern hemisphere, with particularly high populations in northern Russia, Iceland and Greenland.

In other places, however, the weasel dragon is kept as a pet.

It is effective at keeping down mice, rat and rabbit populations, and also is an affectionate companion.

Hope you enjoyed this post! Today I’m off to Gloucester to run my market stall for a whole week! Unfortunately that means there won’t be a new creature on here next sunday- but check in to see some creature design sketches! 

F35: The Sock-Eating Monster

Diet: Socks, underwear, pencils, pens, assorted household items, Jesper’s car keys

Habitat: Under Katerina’s bed

Sock Eater available on etsy!

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Hello! My name is Katerina, and this is my monster. I caught him myself. I am six.

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The sock monster lived under my bed, and ate my stuff. Sometimes I give him the crusts off my sandwiches, because I don’t like them.

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He is shy of adults, but comes out when it’s just me. He ate all the crayons in my box.

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I was in trouble a bit for feeding him. When I grow up I want to be scientist like my uncle Jesper. That’s why I fed him, and took notes of all the things he ate:

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He sleeps most of the day, and comes out at night because he’s nocturnal. He only has two legs, and Uncle Jesper says that’s bipedal. His tail is very strong.

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Sock Eater available on etsy!

F#34: Fire Imp

Also called: Hairy Imp / Firelighter / Little Arsonist

Chaotic elemental creature

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As the evening draw in and winter creeps closer, fires are rekindled in homes across the country- and with them comes this little mischief maker.

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Watch out for your leaf piles, as cute and happy as they look, all it takes is some nice dry tinder and the fire imp will have it alight in moments.

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Widely considered a pest (and health and safety issue), any place of buisiness that has an open fire is subject to strict regulations, inspections, and mandatory anti-elemental warding.

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F#33: Ornamental Hippogriff (wingless)

(Ornamental Hippogriff on etsy)

First brought to the Britain by the Victorians, the ornamental hippogriff still wanders the grand estate grounds and parkland- and the countryside, as they quickly escaped captivity and flourished independently.

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Unlike their large winged cousins, who thrive in cold climates, this breed of small hippogriff prefers mild winters; they keep their short, soft fur all year ’round and don’t grow the distinctive thick white fur that true hippogriffs are known for.

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Avid insectivores, these creatures are a great solution to garden pests- particularly fond of slugs and caterpillars.

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Due to their association with wealth and land, they often appear on heraldry and in portraits: a symbol of fortune.

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F#28: Hexury

This six legged rodent is an effective harvester, active in hedgerows, farmland, woods and even urban environments from spring to autumn.

Commonly characterized in folklore and stories as greedy and selfish, the hexury is merely an accomplished survivor; weathering even the harshest winters with ease in their secure, cosy ‘pantries’.

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They make their winter home in a variety of places, including rocky crevices, rotten logs and holes in tree roots.

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Once their collection is deemed sufficient, they seal themselves inside with a wall of gathered fur, dry grass, mud and saliva. Once secured, a typical hoard can last up to six months, though rarely is that required.

F#27: Silkwing

Sometimes called ‘cloud mouse’ or ‘false dragon’, the silkwing is delicate creature that is often romantically described as ‘travelling with the winds’.

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As autumn arrives, you’ll see silkwings far more often in the skies along the coast. They’ve flown in from the inland meadows where the spend the summer; riding the strong winds to wheel and gather in flocks of tens to hundreds strong. IMG_5657

Come early October, after a month of socializing and cementing strong flock relationships,  the silkwings migrate to winter in the southern hemisphere.

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Goodbye ’til next summer, cloud mouse.

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